Category Archives: Relaxing

Isn’t that Crappie?

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Crappie fishing can’t be any better!

Another evening living in Pendleton, Oregon what to do?  How about some  crappie fishing at McKay Reservoir? 

When I’m not working as a broker for Sykes Real Estate or running Rapid Print, my printing business, I’m fishing! Catching crappie isn’t tough if you know what to do.

To catch a  lot of crappie you don’t need to be professional fisherman,  have a $20,000 boat,  or a $300 fishing pole and reel.  I’ll give you the run down of supplies.  I will also give you some pointers to catch crappie in Pendleton’s McKay Reservoir.  The fishing tackle and technique will work for most crappie fishing in Oregon.  Let’s get going!

Here’s what you need!

5ft Light Rod & Reel Combo I Got at Wal-Mart for $30

4-6 lb test line is all you are going to need for most lake fishing.

So you have a rod and reel now for the good stuff!

The most inportant thing you are going to need is bait and I find crappie jigs are the way to go.
The picture below is of my own crappie jigs. I used an Oregon quarter to show the relative size.   I’ve seen people fish with line wrapped around a beer can, but they always had a jig attached to the hook.

Jig Bodies $2-$4 for 25 at Bi-Mart

Crappie jigs come in different colors and sizes, but these are the jigs that I have had the most luck on.  The ultimate jig color is a white glow in the dark, but I haven’t used those in a while since the local mini-mart stopped carrying them.  If you can find those, snatch them up!  If  you notice the jigs are not that big and the simple answer to that is, crappie aren’t that big.  If I’m looking for a meal, I will catch five, 10-12 inch crappie, but there is no limit on size or quantity, so it’s up to you.  Here is a link to ODFW fishing website for fishing regulation!

Other supplies that I use!

A jig head with hook attached, swivel and bobber.  Again, I wanted to show the relative size of the fishing supplies.

Jig Head $2-$3 for 10 Swivel $2-$3 for 15 and Bobber $2-$3 for 10

The jig head with hook goes into the body of the jig. A swivel is used to keep your line from twisting and the bobber is used to keep your bait off the lake bottom.  I usually attach a bobber on the fishing line  1-2 feet above my jig or bait, right in the sweet spot.   I let the fishing tools do all the work.  I like to to relax when I fish for crappie.

How to apply jig head to body of the jig then tie to fishing line!

How to insert jig head in to the body of the jig

Push the pointy end of the hook through the end of the jig body, keep pushing until the hook comes out near the end of the skirt “the wavy pink arms in these pictures.”   Make sure you secure the jig into the body all the way or it will come off.  I’ve had that happen and wondered why I wasn’t catching anything.  After you have inserted the jig head into the body of the jig, next is tying your line to the jig.  For this I use one of the most common sport fishing knots.

The Clinch Knot

The Clinch Knot

This knot is used by most sport fishermen to attach a swivel or jig to their line.  This knot is strong and won’t slip, but it does take some practice.  I have tied this knot 1,000’s of times and if done right, you wont have to worry about your knot coming undone.   Here is step by step instruction to The Clinch Knot hit play and try it out for yourself.  There are many knots you can learn that will help you fish, but will help in everyday life also.

So, you have learned what to use, now you need some technique!

If you are unfamiliar of how to cast, learning how to cast is best done by learning from someone else, but if you’re the independent type, try your backyard.  If you want to get ready for your upcoming crappie fishing event, but don’t know how to cast, get familiar with casting in your back yard.  You can practice alone and you also get the benefit of straightening your line.  Most fishing line is coiled around a spool which bends the line.  When fishing line is bent for a long period of time it forms a memory of the spool it was coiled around.  The line will come off the spool in coils.  Some fishermen straighten their line by stretching it all the way out and pulling on it to get the bends out.

Fishing Line

So, you have all your gear, you know how to tie a fishing knot and learned how to cast.  Now it’s time to hit the lake!

Crappie fishing is best done in the morning or in the evening, and because I am a night owl, I prefer the evening.  During the summer months at McKay reservoir and I assume most places, there is a time of the evening between 7-9 that the fish start to feed, you will know this because  THE BITE IS ON!  This could last a 1/2 hour or go two full hours depending on water temp, how much food the fish are already eating, but they will hit your jig over and over.

Finding a good spot and going for it!

You will need to find a spot that looks good.  Look for a tree near by for shade and make sure the water is deep enough for fish to swim down out of the sunlight.  I fish two different ways.  One way is to use a bobber. Set the bobber 1-2 feet above your jig, throw it in and let it sit.  Once you see that bobber go under, FISH ON!  The other way is to jig the bottom.  This doesn’t require a bobber, but you will have to be more active.  The technique is to let the jig sink to the bottom of the lake and when it hits, pull your pole up, then let is sink back to the bottom again.  Up down, up down, this simulates a swimming food source.  This takes some practice and a touch to know when to set the hook. You should try it in a shallow part of the lake to see what it looks like.  Those are the only two I use and I have great success, easy huh?

Whelp, that’s it! I think it’s your turn, now that you know what to do!

As you can see I just started!

Good luck and maybe I’ll do another post on filleting your crappie.  They are so good battered and fried in a little oil.

I live in Pendleton, Oregon and this is what I do for fun!

Visit my website www.pendletonproperties.net Looking for a home in Pendleton or Oregon in general.  Call me and I will email you all the information on the house you are interested in.  Chris Sykes, Sykes Real Estate (541)215-2274

Top 10 Things to do in Pendleton Oregon Part V

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9) Check out new and exciting artists at the Pendleton Center for the Arts

The Pendleton
Center for the Arts is a great place to
view, buy and make art. We offer fine arts exhibits, live music performances,
arts education for youth, teens and adults, and a great venue for purchasing
hand-crafted fine gifts made by regional artists.

Located in the heart of Eastern Oregon, our beautifully restored 1916 Carnegie Library building is an architectural treasure in its own right. The Center caps one end of a downtown core that is regaining its vitality and charm. Community members use the building for weddings, receptions, meetings and parties of all kind.

You can take a quick
video tour of the building HERE.

This
website is owned and maintained by the Arts Council of Pendleton and the
Pendleton Center for the Arts © 2005

The
Arts Council of Pendleton is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization established
in 1974

Hot
Tickets:

Visit us: Tuesday – Friday
10:00 am to 4:00 pm, Saturday Noon – 4:00 pm

We also feature an
important – and FREE – after-school program for teens called Art Rocks Teens (A.R.T.).

We work to make the
viewing and making of art accessible to everyone. We hope you’ll visit us and
take advantage of the wide range of events and activities available. AND we hope
you’ll support us with your membership so that we may
continue to provide great art experiences for the community. Corey’s Kids Art Fund provides an
opportunity for teens and young adults to donate to the arts.

We’re indebted to the
many individuals, business members, foundations and organizations
whose financial support made the renovation of our building possible and makes
it possible for us to provide ongoing services.

Check out our important
Business Members HERE.

Want to see YOUR
artwork at the Center? Get more info here.

If you’re detail oriented, have a strong understanding of sound bookkeeping principles and value a flexible schedule, you could be a great addition to our crew. Position available
for a part-time bookkeeper (80 hrs/mo). Submit resume and cover letter before
July 15. Pendleton Center for the Arts 214 North Main.

Rdescription HEREead the full job

http://www.pendletonarts.org/index_files/Introduction.htm

10) Take a stroll along the Umatilla River on the River Parkway or along Pendleton’s historic Main Street

Pendleton River Parkway

Step onto the Pendleton River Parkway and step into nature. Almost three miles of flat trail takes you through the heart of Pendleton along the banks of the Umatilla  River. Take a few minutes to explore other city landmarks along the  way. For suggestions from locals, keep scrolling down. Restrooms  are located along the Parkway at Roy Raley Park, Stillman Park and  Brownfield Park.

Driving Directions: Take exit 207 off I-84, travel east on Westgate (Hwy. 30) approximately 2 miles,  turn left at Westgate Place, park at the end of the cul-de-sac where the River Parkway trail begins. Additional parking available at Roy Raley Park, Stillman Park, the east end of Byers, and Bedford Bridge at SW 18th Street. Map available under City Parks.

Distances on the trail:

FROM

TO

DISTANCE

Little League Ball Park SE 8th Street 3/4 mile
SE 8th Street Main Street/Brownfield Park 1/2 mile
Main Street/Brownfield Park SW 10th Street/Roy Raley Park 1/2 mile
SW 10th Street/Roy Raley Park SW 18th/Amy Bedford Bridge 1/2 mile
SW 18th Street/Amy Bedford Bridge Highway 30 Bridge/Babe Ruth Ball Park 1/4 mile
Highway 30 Bridge/Babe Ruth Ball Park NW Carden 1/4 mile

Other Walking Trails

Pendleton Community Park
Access from SW 41st, SW 37th and SW 44th Street  parking areas; no hills; users may walk 1/2 mile loops on either side of the  creek or cross the pedestrian bridge and walk a mile circling the exterior  border of the park; the park is somewhat protected from the wind; restrooms available*.

McKay Neighborhood Park
Access from SW 44th next to McKay School;  approximately 1/2 mile of walking path with hills; restrooms are available*.

Rice-Blakey Park

Access from SW Quinney & SW 24th; approximately 2/3  mile of path over scenic hilly terrain; sometimes a little windy; parking on SW  26th; restrooms are available*.

Grecian Heights Park
Access from Tutuilla Road and Athens Way; north side  walking path is approximately 1/2 mile; south side walking path is approximately  1/2 mile; restrooms are available*.

Olney Cemetery

Mature trees and slightly challenging grade changes make Olney Cemetery a great  spot to bump up your routine a little. The cemetery may be a surprising  recommendation for a walking trail, but try it sometime and you’ll discover its  appeal. Sorry, no restrooms.

*Restrooms are closed during winter months due to risk of freezing pipes and are  unlocked on April 1 each year.

http://www.pendletonparksandrec.com/river_walk

 

www.pendletonproperties.net

Top 10 Things to do in Pendleton Oregon Part II

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Enjoy the Oregon East Symphony Orchestra at the Vert Auditorium

About the Oregon East Symphony

For twenty-five years the Oregon East Symphony, called “the best small-town symphony orchestra in North America,” has provided Pendleton and its surrounding rural region with high quality musical experiences and events. A volunteer Board of Directors guides the Symphony, which is administered by an Executive Director and Office Manager. Last season we said goodbye to long time Conductor and Music Director Kenneth Woods, who departs for new horizons. Concertmaster Lisa Robertson will fulfill the position of Interim Music Director while we undergo a search process for a new Conductor/Music Director. We will feature finalists in our search for a new conductor during our 2009-2011 concert seasons. A separate volunteer Guild supports the activities of the orchestra and chorale by providing concert receptions and sponsoring fund-raising events.Musicians with the Oregon East Symphony come from around the Pacific Northwest region to play. They hail from as far away as Portland, Eugene, Joseph, Baker City and LaGrande in Oregon and Spokane, Pullman, Vancouver, Tacoma, Ellensburg, Yakima, Tricities and Walla Walla in Washington. The OES wishes to encourage all musicians, young and old to find their musical roots and join in the music. You will always be welcome in the orchestra that fits your level of performance. Auditions are not required to join the orchestra.

In addition to its regular concert series, the Symphony is committed to a unique and comprehensive youth music education project ( Playing for Keeps) that supports, among other activities, two preparatory orchestras, a youth chorale, a mentorship program for young musicians, scholarships for instrument rentals and music lessons, an annual Summer Music Camp, and free concert tickets for students.

http://www.oregoneastsymphony.org/home

 Go for a hike in the nearby Umatilla and Wallowa-Whitman National Forest

The Umatilla National Forest, located in the Blue Mountains of southeast Washington and northeast Oregon, covers 1.4 million acres of diverse landscapes and plant communities. The forest has some mountainous terrain, but most of the forest consists of v-shaped valleys separated by narrow ridges or plateaus. The landscape also includes heavily timbered slopes, grassland ridges and benches, and bold basalt outcroppings. Elevation range from 1,600 to 8,000 feet above sea level. Changes in weather are common, but summers are generally warm and dry with cool evenings. Cold, snowy winters and mild temperatures during spring and fall can be expected.

About the Umatilla National Forest

The Umatilla National Forest in Northeast Oregon and Southeast Washington is administered from the Forest Supervisor’s Office in Pendleton, Oregon and four Ranger Districts. The Forest Supervisor, assisted by a professional and technical staff, is responsible for all activities affecting the 1.4 million National Forest acres. District Rangers and their staffs accomplish on-the-ground management of forest resources.

The National Forest system is administered by the USDA Forest Service. The Umatilla National Forest is within the Pacific Northwest Region which includes the 19 National Forests in Washington and Oregon. Headquarters for the Pacific Northwest Region are located at the Robert Duncan Plaza, 333 S.W. 1st st., P.O. Box 3623, Portland, Oregon 97208, (503) 808-2200.

Like all National Forests, the Umatilla belongs to all Americans and is managed under the multiple-use principle ‘for the greatest good of the greatest number in the long run.’

Umatilla National Forest map!

Wallowa-Whitman National Forest

The Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, 2.3 million acres of varied landscape, extends from the Blue Mountains and rugged Wallowa Mountains down to the spectacular canyon country of the Snake River on the Idaho border.

The forest ranges in elevation from 875 feet in the Hells Canyon National Receation Area to 9,845 feet in the Eagle Cap Wilderness Area.

We manage the forest as sustainable ecosystems providing clean water, wildlife habitat and valuable forest products. This setting offers a variety of year-round recreation opportunities.

Wallowa-Whitman National Forest Map!

Top 10 Things to do in Pendleton Oregon part I

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1) Go to the world famous Pendleton Round Up:

SEPT. 14-17, 2011  Pendleton, Oregon

The first Pendleton Round-Up was to be “a frontier exhibition of picturesque pastimes, Indian and military spectacles, cowboy racing and bronco busting for the championship of the Northwest.” It turned out to be that and more.

For the initial show, all stores closed. “The largest crowd in Pendleton’s history,” 7,000 strong, showed up for the first show on September 29, 1910, a newspaper write reported.

“The words ‘Pendleton’ and Round-Up’ are on the lips of thousands and will continue to be for months and years to come… The Round-Up is a whirlwind success.”

Souvenir program from The 1913 Round-Up

Grow it did. Two decades later, patrons showed up from 36 states and eight foreign countries. Following two years in which the Round-Up was not held, because of World War II, attendance climbed again, eventually reaching 50,000 or more for the four-day show.

“Success bred success and Round-Up stayed in high gear,” says the book “Let ‘er Buck! A history of the Pendleton Round-Up.”

The key to the success of the rodeo and its many attendant activities is community participation – volunteers.

Indian participation has been a strong attraction, too, in the Round-Up arena, at Happy Canyon, in the Indian Village and in the Westward Ho! Parade.

Long before women’s lib, the fairer sex got into the act at the Round-Up – cowgirls in the early days of the Round-Up could be as tough as men. In 1914 Bertha Blanchett, wife of cowboy Del Blancett, came within 12 points of winning the all-around title.

Midway through the Round-Up’s colorful history, a Eugene newspaper summed it up with a characterization that remains applicable today:

“In good times and bad, Pendleton has gone on with the Round-Up. People over on the Umatilla have always been willing to take a chance. Maybe that’s the real cowboy spirit. Maybe it’s a little bit tougher brand of civic spirit. Anyhow, in Pendleton, the show goes on.”

http://pendletonroundup.com/

2) Take a tour of the Pendleton Woolen Mills

Welcome To The Pendleton Mill Store

Mill History
In 1909, with family and town backing, the Bishop sons started up an idle mill in Pendleton, Oregon.

The town of Pendleton, a major railhead serving the Columbia Plateau, was a wool shipping center for sheep growers of the region. The mill, originally built in 1893, began as a wool scouring plant, which washed the raw wool before shipping. Due to increased freight tariffs on the shipment of scoured wool, the business soon became unprofitable.

In 1895, the scouring plant was enlarged and converted into a woolen mill which made bed blankets and robes for Native Americans. This venture also failed and the mill went idle. In 1909, the Bishops opened the facility and constructed a new, more efficient mill building with aid of a local bond issue. In September of that year, the first products emerged from the new finishing department and the tradition of Pendleton Woolen Mills began.

Today the mill stands on the same foundation as it did in 1909, but has added a retail operation along with investments in state-of-the-art technology.

Mill Tour InformationVisitors to the Pendleton Mill store are invited to take a free tour of the mill. Here you can see and learn about the renown Pendleton weaving process. When you’re finished you can visit our Mill Store where you can select from Pendleton’s array of menswear, womenswear, blankets and fabrics.

Public tours for individuals and small groups (under 10 persons) are held weekdays, at 9 am, 11 am, 1:30 pm, and 3 pm. Reservations are not required, however tour spaces are filled on a first come basis. When necessary, extra tours may be added to the existing tour schedule if sufficient tour staff is available. Tours take about 20 minutes.

To place a tour reservation call the Pendleton Mill store 541-276-6911

How to Find Us
1307 SE Court Pl, Pendleton Oregon 97801

http://www.pendleton-usa.com/custserv/custserv.jsp?pageName=PendletonMill&parentName=AboutUs